Suzuki GS Twin Digest #21-30


GSTwin-digest           Sunday, May 18 1997           Volume 01 : Number 021




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 15 May 1997 21:57:20 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: Re: GSTwin Megacycle cams

> Can someone tell me where to find these $200 GS500 engines? I have a
> GS500E with a cam bearing bolt broken off in the head and an ez-out broken
> off in the bolt. :-( I'll have to fix it up one of these days.
> Dan

Hello Dan,

If the head isn't damaged look in your yellow pages under Machine
Shops and call around until you find one that does electrical
discharge machining (EDM).  They'll have the tap and bolt out in a
flash.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 16 May 1997 09:03:15 -0400 (EDT)
From: fshixon@muskie.lerc.nasa.gov (D Hixon)
Subject: Re: GSTwin Megacycle cams

About the cheap GS engines:  Cleveland Cycle Salvage used to help me
out with them  The two engines I bought were $250 and $150, with the
$250 one being a runner and the $150 one being a parts engine in all
senses of the words.  Of course, the scruffy starving racer appearance and
the fact that I took them out on my own probably helped the price ;).

On another note, I saw the Hanson tail that Paul Nelson bought, and it's
on my wish list right after a finished engine and revalved forks and a
race weekend ;)...

Have fun,

Ray Hixon
(cams still available...)

- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
R Hixon                         |     phone: (216) 962-3146
ICOMP, Ohio Aerospace Institute |     NASB #623
22800 Cedar Point RD            |     1995 Triumph Speed Triple for sale...
Brook Park, Ohio  44142         |     email:  fshixon@muskie.lerc.nasa.gov 
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 16 May 1997 19:43:01 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: GSTwin Hanson tail?

> On another note, I saw the Hanson tail that Paul Nelson bought, and it's
> on my wish list
> Ray Hixon

Ray is referring to one of the big aerodynamic seats that my
friend/mentor/tuner Craig Hanson designed in the mid-80s.  You can
see a picture of one of the seats on an XL250 road racer under
Craig's section on the graphics page of my web site.  One of these
seats in carbon fiber from the current production run is reserved
for use on my EX250 + 125GP = ? project bike. 

It may look funny, but it has been proven to be worth noticeable 
speed increases over a typical GP-style seat.   It's curious how many 
people would rather have their bike look like their friends' bikes 
instead of "looking funny" and going faster.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 18 May 1997 18:41:31 -1000 (HST)
From: straubis@pixi.com (Straub Tech)
Subject: GSTwin Front Headlight?

Does any know what years that Suzuki used the "Large" headlight?  I remember
a friend who had one on an old GS and I was wondering about the year and
availability of one.


Robert

------------------------------

End of GSTwin-digest V1 #21
***************************
GSTwin-digest           Monday, May 19 1997           Volume 01 : Number 022




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 18 May 1997 23:07:00 -0700 (PDT)
From: SUPERBRAT 
Subject: Re: GSTwin Front Headlight?

how large? 

- -Beth

                  DoD#4508, Unitrans#545, AMA#542204 
     Mine: 1982 GS450ES, 1980 GS450ES Projects: 1974 TX650, 1971 CL350
****************************************************************************
        beffie's homepage is kaput until further notice. sorry. :( 

------------------------------

Date: 19 MAY 97 08:37:36 EDT
From: AGabinet@dechert.com
Subject: re: GSTwin Hanson tail?

Here is a request for parts information - I had two fantastic days of 
riding through the VA and PA backroads with my buddy on his Duc 900SS (he 
could leave me in flat out acceleration but couldn't corner faster) -- 
until, in a small town, at 20 MPH, I was looking at an ambulance coming 
into an intersection while he was stopping for it, and I rear ended him.  
Believe it or not, the front forks (the down tube near the brake caliper) 
of my '90 GS500E broke, and I now need to replace the fork assembly from 
the triple clamp down, plus reattach the caliper (which is otherwise OK).  
I need a new front fender and a fairing upper, but that's no biggie.  Is it 
possible to find used forks, and are they worth looking for?  Does anyone 
have a rough idea on new and used prices?  while I'm at it I'm going to get 
the clip ons I've been musing about and put them on.

The duc, by the way, lost the little knob on the shifter, and lost its 
clutch lever.  that plus the nick on the paint ont he left quarter fairing 
will probably run  close to a grand to fix -- just for the parts!  Better 
that than make a claim and see my auto rates jump!  thanks -- Ari Gabinet 
- -------------
Original Text
From: suzuki-gs-twin(a)list.sirius.com, on 5/16/97 10:44 PM:
> On another note, I saw the Hanson tail that Paul Nelson bought, and it's
> on my wish list
> Ray Hixon

Ray is referring to one of the big aerodynamic seats that my
friend/mentor/tuner Craig Hanson designed in the mid-80s.  You can
see a picture of one of the seats on an XL250 road racer under
Craig's section on the graphics page of my web site.  One of these
seats in carbon fiber from the current production run is reserved
for use on my EX250 + 125GP = ? project bike. 

It may look funny, but it has been proven to be worth noticeable 
speed increases over a typical GP-style seat.   It's curious how many 
people would rather have their bike look like their friends' bikes 
instead of "looking funny" and going faster.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for 
constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: 19 MAY 97 08:43:37 EDT
From: AGabinet@dechert.com
Subject: GSTwin Re: forks

also in line with my parts question about my forks, are the forks on the 
'90 GS500E interchangeable with the forks from other models (37mm forks on 
my bike)? -- Ari Gabinet
- -------------
Original Text
From: suzuki-gs-twin(a)list.sirius.com, on 5/16/97 9:04 AM:
About the cheap GS engines:  Cleveland Cycle Salvage used to help me
out with them  The two engines I bought were $250 and $150, with the
$250 one being a runner and the $150 one being a parts engine in all
senses of the words.  Of course, the scruffy starving racer appearance and
the fact that I took them out on my own probably helped the price ;).

On another note, I saw the Hanson tail that Paul Nelson bought, and it's
on my wish list right after a finished engine and revalved forks and a
race weekend ;)...

Have fun,

Ray Hixon
(cams still available...)

- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
R Hixon                         |     phone: (216) 962-3146
ICOMP, Ohio Aerospace Institute |     NASB #623
22800 Cedar Point RD            |     1995 Triumph Speed Triple for sale...
Brook Park, Ohio  44142         |     email:  fshixon@muskie.lerc.nasa.gov 
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 19 May 1997 10:20:23 -0700
From: hwoien@juno.com (Harvey M Woien)
Subject: GSTwin Which oil?

Yes, I know, this subject has been thrashed a lot on all kinds of lists,
but I still am in a quandry.  There are those who opine that multi-grade
oils for cars (SJ) are not good for modern motorcycles because the
bike's gears and clutch share the oil. Theoretically, special oils such
as Spectro are compatible with gears and clutches. Then there are those
who say synthetic oil is not good for m/c clutches. But Golden
Spectro contains a blend of synthetic, right?  I talked to a mechanic
who has been maintaining LAPD (Los Angeles Police Dep't) vehicles
(including the various brands of bikes) for years and he says you can't
go wrong with Castrol or Valvoline 20-50-  (for California, anyway).

My new GS500 got its first oil change at 600 miles, Golden Spectro
20-50 which the dealer recommended.  I am undecided whether to continue
with this oil, or go to the much more convenient  to get, 
Castrol/Valvoline 20-50.

OK, let's hear it.  What's the collective thinking here.  We're talking
street use, not racing.

Harvey Woien

1967 BSA B44 - Valvoline Racing 50 in engine, gear lube in trans,
                           10 wt non-detergent in primary drive

1971 BSA A65    Ditto

New GS500E     Golden Spectro 20-50

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 19 May 1997 07:46:16 -1000 (HST)
From: straubis@pixi.com (Straub Tech)
Subject: Re: GSTwin Front Headlight?

>how large? 
>
That's rather personal...  

Oh, the headlight ;)  The GS500 is about 8" and I thought that there was one
about 9" or 10".

Could I have been mistaken?

Robert

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 19 May 1997 15:20:09 -0400
From: Brad Babcock 
Subject: Re: GSTwin Which oil?

My FWIW on this is my practice with my own bikes.  Valvoline Racing 50 in
the engine and transmission of my 1965 Royal Enfield Interceptor, Mobil I
15-50 in my Japanese bikes, 1982 Suzuki GS550M (22,000 miles), 1983 Suzuki
GS450E (35,000 miles), 1987 Yamaha SRX250 (14,000 miles).  Originally when
I switched to synthetic, I went to Pennzoil 5-50.  I changed to the Mobil I
because the Pennzoil found enough places to come out that the entire
outside of the engine was coated with a film of oil.  The Mobil doesn't do
this to as great an extent.  I'm assuming that it's related to the 15w vs.
5w bottom end.  With either synthetic, the oil pressure light goes out
quicker, the idle speed went up slightly, and the shifts and clutch were
smoother.  This was with all three bikes.  They get oil and filter changes
every 2-3,000 miles, and are ridden enthusiastically, not abusively.  Hope
this helps.
Regards,
Brad

>My new GS500 got its first oil change at 600 miles, Golden Spectro
>20-50 which the dealer recommended.  I am undecided whether to continue
>with this oil, or go to the much more convenient  to get,
>Castrol/Valvoline 20-50.
>
>OK, let's hear it.  What's the collective thinking here.  We're talking
>street use, not racing.
>
>Harvey Woien
>
>1967 BSA B44 - Valvoline Racing 50 in engine, gear lube in trans,
>                           10 wt non-detergent in primary drive
>
>1971 BSA A65    Ditto
>
>New GS500E     Golden Spectro 20-50

------------------------------

End of GSTwin-digest V1 #22
***************************
GSTwin-digest          Tuesday, May 20 1997          Volume 01 : Number 023




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 19 May 1997 16:06:06 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: Re: GSTwin Front Headlight?

> Oh, the headlight ;)  The GS500 is about 8" and I thought that there was one
> about 9" or 10".
> Robert

Hello Robert,

I think that 8" OD is about the biggest you'll find in a MC headlight 
- - 7" is more common on older bikes.

Cheers,
Michael 
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 19 May 1997 16:29:46 -0700 (PDT)
From: SUPERBRAT 
Subject: Re: GSTwin Re: forks

i've heard that you can transplant a GSXR front end on a GS500E. i would
imagine that you have to go from triple trees to the forks, though.

- -Beth

                  DoD#4508, Unitrans#545, AMA#542204 
     Mine: 1982 GS450ES, 1980 GS450ES Projects: 1974 TX650, 1971 CL350
****************************************************************************
        beffie's homepage is kaput until further notice. sorry. :( 

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 19 May 1997 14:09:54 -1000 (HST)
From: straubis@pixi.com (Straub Tech)
Subject: Re: GSTwin Re: forks

>i've heard that you can transplant a GSXR front end on a GS500E. i would
>imagine that you have to go from triple trees to the forks, though.
>
Yep, just have them press out the GS stem and press it into the GSXR lower
triple.

I'm personally going through that right now.


Robert

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 20 May 1997 10:30:50 +1000 (EST)
From: d.weiszmann@unsw.edu.au (Dorothy Weiszmann)
Subject: Re: GSTwin Re: forks

>i've heard that you can transplant a GSXR front end on a GS500E. i would
>imagine that you have to go from triple trees to the forks, though.
>
>-Beth


I've heard the front end of an Across (GSX250?) is the same as a GS500E, the
only difference is the disc is on the other side. 

cath.

------------------------------

Date: 20 MAY 97 09:56:17 EDT
From: AGabinet@dechert.com
Subject: Reply regarding GSTwin Re: forks

thanks to all who responded.  I found the forks at a cycle salvage place 
here in philadelphia for $300 -- half the price of new parts.  I'm getting 
a new frame mounted fairing and finally putting the telefix clip ons onto 
the bike.  Soon I'll be inquiring about boring out the cylinders and 
getting hotter cams . . . Who needs to buy a new YZF600R or GSX600R -- I'll 
just trick out my 500.
- -------------
Original Text
From: suzuki-gs-twin(a)list.sirius.com, on 5/19/97 7:33 PM:
i've heard that you can transplant a GSXR front end on a GS500E. i would
imagine that you have to go from triple trees to the forks, though.

- -Beth

                  DoD#4508, Unitrans#545, AMA#542204 
     Mine: 1982 GS450ES, 1980 GS450ES Projects: 1974 TX650, 1971 CL350
****************************************************************************
        beffie's homepage is kaput until further notice. sorry. :( 

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 20 May 1997 16:35:36 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: Re: Reply regarding GSTwin Re: forks

> the bike.  Soon I'll be inquiring about boring out the cylinders and 
> getting hotter cams . . . Who needs to buy a new YZF600R or GSX600R -- I'll 
> just trick out my 500.

The fun and expense will never stop (unless you've got more self
control than I do) once you embark upon the slippery slope of
performance modifications!

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

End of GSTwin-digest V1 #23
***************************
GSTwin-digest           Friday, May 23 1997           Volume 01 : Number 024




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Date: Wed, 21 May 1997 19:58:38 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: GSTwin CR216 article and Dunstall registry

> Tell us about the performance of your CB160, Michael!   
>Thanks,  Bill Silver

Being the obliging soul that I am, I've just added an article to my
web site on my CR216 Honda vintage road racer.

In addition, I've added a link to the Dunstall Owners' Register home
page to the club links page.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 22 May 1997 15:21:04 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: GSTwin Another reason why bikes are better than cars

I ran across this poem by an anonymous UK rider today:

Oh damsel fair, beware the car
Where seating space is wider far
Than any man of reason needs
Except to further his misdeeds.
The steering column change eschew
No good can come of it for you-
And likewise any motor shun
From which you can't bale out and run.

Let maiden modesty decide
To take a summer evening ride
On Something of the cycle breed
For virtue's friend was ever speed
No vulpine sibilance can come
From guileless lips of goggled chum.

With passion he is never dizzy
(his motor keeps him far too busy)
And even dual seats preclude
The acrobatic interlude.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 22 May 1997 17:50:52 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: GSTwin More photos

I've just added some photos of Tony Foale's QL-series of bikes with
his alternative front end/chassis.  They include the prototype front
end on his BMW street bike, the Ducati and BMW QLs, and the Suzuki
engined QL2.  

They are in the section for Tony's bikes on the graphics page.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 23 May 1997 05:21:04 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: GSTwin Admin absence

I'll be out of town Friday and Saturday so if the list blows up there 
won't be anyone around to try and fix it.  See you in a couple of 
days.

Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

End of GSTwin-digest V1 #24
***************************
GSTwin-digest         Wednesday, May 28 1997         Volume 01 : Number 025




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Date: Wed, 28 May 1997 09:46:34 -0700
From: mgd2@mgd.Ebay.Sun.COM (Mike)
Subject: GSTwin Is anyone there?

Hello!

I joined the list last week, and haven't seen any postings.  Is
there anyone out there?

I have a '91 GS500E with California specs.  I really like it and
have done the following:

- - progressive fork springs
- - stainless front brake line
- - BT-35

The bike needs almost no maintenance, and does it's job very
well.  Although it can't keep up with it's new younger brother
(my new TL).  Oh well, the girlfriend like to ride pillion on
the GS much more than the TL.  Wines about being afraid of ralling
off or something.

All in all I like it, am keeping it and want to get some ideas
for future mods.  Anyone??  Nothing too radical, like bore kits,
just run of the mill stuff.  Ignition advancers, etc.

Thanks,

Mike

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 May 1997 13:26:54 -0400
From: Brad Babcock 
Subject: Re: GSTwin Is anyone there?

Hi Mike,
Welcome to the list.  There's not a huge amount of traffic, so you may have
just hit one of the slack periods.  I can't help you much with performance
mods, as my '83 GS450E is dead stock with the exception of some suspension
upgrades and Avon Roadrunners.  That said, it's got 35,000 miles on it, has
been very reliable mechanically (some electrical problems), and is the
easiest of my five bikes to ride quickly and comfortably.  It's also the
one that'll always have a place in my garage.  I envy you your TL, but I
really think the GS twins are severely underrated by everyone but their
owners.  Take care.
Regards,
Brad

>Hello!
>
>I joined the list last week, and haven't seen any postings.  Is
>there anyone out there?
>
>I have a '91 GS500E with California specs.  I really like it and
>have done the following:
>
>- progressive fork springs
>- stainless front brake line
>- BT-35
>
>The bike needs almost no maintenance, and does it's job very
>well.  Although it can't keep up with it's new younger brother
>(my new TL).  Oh well, the girlfriend like to ride pillion on
>the GS much more than the TL.  Wines about being afraid of ralling
>off or something.
>
>All in all I like it, am keeping it and want to get some ideas
>for future mods.  Anyone??  Nothing too radical, like bore kits,
>just run of the mill stuff.  Ignition advancers, etc.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Mike

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 May 1997 16:52:52 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: Re: GSTwin Is anyone there?

> I joined the list last week, and haven't seen any postings.  Is
> there anyone out there?
> All in all I like it, am keeping it and want to get some ideas
> for future mods.  Anyone??  Nothing too radical, like bore kits,
> just run of the mill stuff.  Ignition advancers, etc.

Hello Mike,

Welcome to the list.  There are people out there - 26 in fact. 
However, it is up to the list members to ensure that there is some
traffic to read.  I'll post what I can when I think of something,
but with running 4 other lists, being on 11 additional lists, and
running Euro Spares, working my day job and making minimal progress
on 25 (or so) project bikes I can't provide all the list traffic by
myself!

Avoid (like the plague) the ignition advancers.  Do see about 
checking your cam timing and get that spot on.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 May 1997 00:16:21 -0400 (EDT)
From: MJBoltuc@aol.com
Subject: GSTwin hello

hello people of GS 

I'm Ken Lehman, UNEMPLOYED graduated Env. Eng. from Raleigh NC.
My first bike of recent was a RZ 350, which I love dearly.  I bought it from
a high school bud.
While in school, I decided to go racing.  I bought another RZ  to go to
school on.  Two cracked heads, one from previous owner and one from the guy
who said that leaving water in a race bike over the winter was the stupidest
thing in the world to do.
I traded a virago that somebody gave me for a '89 GS500E with no front end.
 John lent me a set of hurricane forks/wheel to make a roller.  I told a
friend Dave that he could go to school with me and use the GS.  The race RZ
was being a bitch and some guy sold me another '89 GS500E for $500 with a
steering dampener and a used Lazer comp K. that he paid $500 for and drove to
NY to get, changed his mind about racing and bought a DUCK 900.  (you might
notice the growing trend for PAIR-O-BIKES).....
2.5 RZ'S
2.5 YSR'S
3 GS500E'S
TT600- for the motor for SOS future proj
XT125 - to learn how to flat track(future)
DT125 - motor to shove into the last YSR and have a YSR with elec. start
GSXR bastard bike kat 600 motor in 86 1100 chassis w/ ZX11 wheels
and a bunch of crates full of weird parts.
most everything was traded for or very cheap.
I also used to go to local shops and take out the trash(scrap metal runs)
LOTS OF GOOD LITTLE PARTS BOLTED TO TWISTED SHIT.

Well the first GS was sold to john and it has been raced by several people in
the South East( only GS I've ever seen W/ a F1 F/E) dual brakes, slide into
GS tripples, but a 2.5 x 17 rim
The second '89 is my track dog
installed  A/M springs from a CBR F1
front steel brake line W/ SBS race pads(#597RQ)
Stage 3 Jet Kit
FJ1200 supertrap slip-on (generic high pipe)
John welded some brackets on the frame and I mounted a FZR 600 upper frg 
I made some spacers and swapped the bars and mounted them up side
down(lowered them about 2 inches, I recommend using F1 handlebars )
I run 591 street compounds (110/70/17 and a 140/70/17)
It makes about 40 HP
and is a blast to flog the shit out of
its black but should have white patches on it cause it thinks its a cow and
loves to graze off the track.

I'm working on the capital thing so I can race once or twice this year.

My new bike I got from my friend Ed for turning his GS back into a street
bike to sell.
(for sale 1989 GS500E title 13000 miles, '94 motor ~500, guages 2000 miles
painted charcoal grey------$$1000.00)   I got the parts bike for the labor of
painting it and restreeting it.

the parts bike.... the KILLER GS/GSX/GSXR 5??
bought a bandit 400 F/E (41mm vs 37)from Hawaii - swap took ~5 hrs with hand
tools
eurospares list said a GSXR  750 4.5x17 bolt in swap
not for me, bearing problem....
got the wrong year GSXR swingarm for a friend, from chicago, and was not
worth sending back.  Hey, its kinda close.  Shove the pivot brgs in a little
and hack saw the edges a little and it might fit.  Hey it fit, now i just
need the bushings to match the pivot bolt....shit, nope.  Stop in at local
machine shop.  
"Cool we'll hook you up, come back in a couple of days"
today 5/29/97
I will use the GS linkage with the GSXR swingarm.
another bushing for the links and I have a GSXR 750 rear suspension on my GS

next will be a custom axle (We'll hook you up in our spare time) to allow a
GSXR 3.5 x 17 front wheel.  also happen to find a nice remote resevoir M/C
and a 6 pot to do the stopping.

motor  hopefully this summer.....????? about 50-55 reliable 
just got the service man.  A YAMAHA manual it is not.
cams ----------------------any sug?
deck cyl./head
port head
carbs

body will be TZ or modified(narrowed) GSXR since I have a set of each(wadded
of course. But fixable) 

Hey if your going to pipe dream... do it big 

Ken Lehman
WERA se  643nv

------------------------------

End of GSTwin-digest V1 #25
***************************
GSTwin-digest          Thursday, May 29 1997          Volume 01 : Number 026




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 May 1997 21:26:18 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: Re: GSTwin hello

> motor  hopefully this summer.....????? about 50-55 reliable 
> just got the service man.  A YAMAHA manual it is not.
> cams ----------------------any sug?
> deck cyl./head
> port head
> carbs
> Ken Lehman

Hello Ken,

and welcome to the list.

Carbs - 39mm CR Special Kei'hins
Megacycle has cams/springs
I can supply the above parts.  My friend Craig can do the head - 
porting, big valves, twin plug, etc as he did to my 5XXcc GS450, as 
well as lightened crankshaft rebalanced to eliminate the balance 
shaft.

It's only money after all, might as well spend it as have it sitting 
around in crumpled wads spontaneously combusting.

Cheers,
Michael 
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 May 1997 09:53:09 +0000
From: Andy Woodward 
Subject: Re: GSTwin Is anyone there?

> I have a '91 GS500E with California specs.  I really like it and
> have done the following:
> 
> - progressive fork springs
> - stainless front brake line
> - BT-35

The front BT35 is something I'd avoid like the plague. Mine wore 
geometricaly traingular after only 2000miles and, combined with the 
rear wearing square, did terrifying stunts going into wet corners :(

The rear is great - it lasts 7000miles instead of teh 4-5000maximum 
I've got from anything else, but the front is suicidal cos the 
maximum wear position is exactly where the compound changes to 
soft!!!!

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 May 1997 08:42:27 -0400 (EDT)
From: Zaner30@aol.com
Subject: Re: GSTwin-digest V1 #25

I'm looking for a first bike and the GS500E is one of my top choices. Mainly
I will be using it to commute at college and for some day trips. Has anyone
taken this bike for a fairly long trip? If so how well did it go? Also, what
are some important things to know about the bike when I buy it?

Thanks
Zane

------------------------------

Date: 29 MAY 97 08:54:20 EDT
From: AGabinet@dechert.com
Subject: GSTwin long trips on gstwin

I rode backroads from Princeton to DC and back -- 7 hours each way on 
twisties and some superslab, on my '90 GS500E (stock).  Until I smacked 
into my buddy's duc at 20 mph, things were going great.  Now I'm redoing 
the front end (just getting the front forks out was a challenge)!  
Seriously, it was comfortable all day, and I kept up with the Duc just 
fine.

Ari Gabinet
'90 GS500E
- -------------
Original Text
From: suzuki-gs-twin(a)list.sirius.com, on 5/29/97 8:46 AM:
I'm looking for a first bike and the GS500E is one of my top choices. 
Mainly
I will be using it to commute at college and for some day trips. Has anyone
taken this bike for a fairly long trip? If so how well did it go? Also, 
what
are some important things to know about the bike when I buy it?

Thanks
Zane

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 May 1997 10:06:26 -0400
From: Brad Babcock 
Subject: Re: GSTwin-digest V1 #25

Hi Zane,
I have a GS450E (1983) and I've taken it to Ontario, 320 miles one way, for
three summers now.  I was able to cruise at 60-70 mph, and wasn't
uncomfortable.  I've also done 450 miles round trip in one day.  That was
about the limit.  One thing I'd recommend is one of the gel type seat pads.
Have fun.
Regards,
Brad

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 May 1997 08:38:22 -0800 (PST)
From: Dan Wang 
Subject: Re: GSTwin hello

With all the talk about swingarm upgrades for a GS500E, has anyone tried
swapping the shock for something better? 
I was wondering if a GSXR shock would fit the stock swingarm. I heard that
an RGV250 shock will fit with minimal modifications, but they're not easy
to find around here.

Dan

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 May 1997 08:58:34 +1000 (EST)
From: d.weiszmann@unsw.edu.au (Dorothy Weiszmann)
Subject: Re: GSTwin-digest V1 #25

>I'm looking for a first bike and the GS500E is one of my top choices. Mainly
>I will be using it to commute at college and for some day trips. Has anyone
>taken this bike for a fairly long trip? If so how well did it go? Also, what
>are some important things to know about the bike when I buy it?
>
>Thanks
>Zane
>

Hi Zane, 

I've had an '89 GS500E for about 5 years, the only trouble was a blown
regulator in all that time. I have used it for commuting & touring & one
track day at Phillip Island :) :)
I've done a few long trips (up to 5000km, daily mileage up to 1000km) with
no trouble. The only thing to watch for is, change the oil before you go. On
a couple of long trips I've found to my puzzlement that the first long
touring day can run the oil level right down to minimum, but after i fill it
up again its fine for the rest of the trip. 
My mechanic tells me this is because my commuting doesn't get the engine hot
enough to boil rubbish out of the oil but a long day riding will, thus
lowering the oil level dramatically. 
I have no idea how rubbish gets in there, the whole concept has me deeply
confused, but from experience changing the oil first appears to solve the
oil loss business & everybody's happy..
Apart from that, which probably happens to all bikes anyway, the thing's
fine to go all day no worries. A sheepskin on the seat will help you go all
day as well. I've been thinking of fitting a small fairing to help with the
wind blast but even that's not really a problem.

Cath.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 May 1997 16:49:29 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: GSTwin Re: long trips

> I will be using it to commute at college and for some day trips. Has anyone
> taken this bike for a fairly long trip? If so how well did it go? Also, what
> are some important things to know about the bike when I buy it?
> Zane

Hello Zane,

My friend Henry rode his GS450s to and from Tulsa OK and San 
Francisco several times, and seems to have survived with no long term 
physical damage.

Cheers,
Michael 
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

End of GSTwin-digest V1 #26
***************************
GSTwin-digest           Friday, May 30 1997           Volume 01 : Number 027




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 May 1997 17:14:09 -0700
From: mgd2@mgd.Ebay.Sun.COM (Mike)
Subject: GSTwin Fairings - good or bad

Are there any good quality fairings that fit on a GS500E that don't
require much more work than just bolting it on?  I've seen pictures
of GS500's from Japan that have full body work.  Does Suzuki sell
fairings for the GS500?  Both uppers and lowers?  And are they
completely out of sight price-wise?  I've seen some after-market,
"this one fits MANY bikes" fairings, but the always seem to need
a lot of work to get them on the bike, and the results *I* would
produce would be less than great.

Anyone with suggestions, experience doing this?

Thanks,

Mike
'91 GS500E

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 May 1997 20:26:51 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: GSTwin Kicking people off the list

> By the way...did you throw me off all of your new lists ... I
> haven't gotten any mail for awhile.

I checked and you aren't currently subscribed.  Some ISPs seem to
bounce up and down, disappear for awhile (as far as the mailing
process goes), can't recognize their own subscribers, people go away
on vacation and their mailboxes get full, etc.  I think this is a
fairly widespread problem.  I'll let a subscriber go for 2-3 days of
bounces, but after that I presume that the email address is terminal
(usually after trying a direct message that gets bounced) and
unsubscribe the person.  If you are in digest mode on my lists you
should be getting a couple of digests a week minimum, so if you don't
get anything after a bit you might drop me a direct email to check.
I've had my ISP contact me to have people unsubscribed when the
bounces get very heavy (ie lots of list traffic).

Sorry for the inconvenience, but MY mailbox starts getting filled up
with bounce messages, and I have to look at each one to see if they
are different people or just one.

I now have instructions on subscribing for all five lists on their own
page on the web site.  I'll see if I can come up with an easy way to
get the digests on the web site, but you can always mail me and let me
know the last digest/message you got and I'll send you the digests you
missed.

Cheers,
Michael 
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 May 1997 08:28:55 -0400 (EDT)
From: MJBoltuc@aol.com
Subject: Re: GSTwin Shock

I used a 92 GSXR stock shock on the track dog.
it has all the adjustments (preload, compression and rebound) the spring is
weak for a 500 lb GSXR but acts like a nice aftermarket unit on the 400 lb GS
shocks that should bolt in are from 88-95 GSXR(early ones did not have
rebound adjustments) late model ZX bikes( 6R, 7R, 9R)
most of the racers have got a fox... and have no need for a stock shock.  I
 think I paid $50.00.  The bike handles/rides much better.
If bored, check out the fox Twin Clicker ADVERT.
It shows spring applications
GS -----              450#, 500#, 550#
GSXR(93-95)---   450-600#
.....
they have different valving but probably should have no effect on street
riding and I think they can be rebuilt and modified for less than the
purchase of a Fox.

ken
WERA se 643nv

------------------------------

Date: 30 MAY 97 08:44:36 EDT
From: AGabinet@dechert.com
Subject: re: GSTwin Fairings - good or bad

In response to mike's inquiry, Suzuki used to make a fairing upper and a 
lower cowling for the GS500.   After my recent low speed front ender on my 
'90 GS500, my fairing was trashed, and I was looking for a replacement.  
Midwest Action Cycle and Parts Depot both advised that Suzuki no longer 
makes the fairing, at least the upper (I never thought the lower cowling 
was worth much).  Anyway, my view is that the handlebar mounted fairing 
wasn't so great, because it tended to destabilize steering, and in the 
stock riding position it didn't offer much wind protection.  My soloution 
- -- I ordered a full frame mounted fairing from Spec II in California.  it 
hasn't arrived yet, so i don't know how hard it will be to mount, but when 
it arrives  I'll post the results!  I also ordered telefix clip ons (on the 
recommendation of a couple of people on this list -- Joyce, in particular); 
I may lower the forks and mount the bars above the triple clamp rather than 
below, but either way, I'm hopingthat the combination of lower riding 
position and frame mounted fairing will be smoother and more responsive 
than the stock bars with the bar mounted non-fairing.  
- -------------
Original Text
From: suzuki-gs-twin(a)list.sirius.com, on 5/29/97 8:21 PM:
Are there any good quality fairings that fit on a GS500E that don't
require much more work than just bolting it on?  I've seen pictures
of GS500's from Japan that have full body work.  Does Suzuki sell
fairings for the GS500?  Both uppers and lowers?  And are they
completely out of sight price-wise?  I've seen some after-market,
"this one fits MANY bikes" fairings, but the always seem to need
a lot of work to get them on the bike, and the results *I* would
produce would be less than great.

Anyone with suggestions, experience doing this?

Thanks,

Mike
'91 GS500E

s

------------------------------

Date: 30 MAY 97 08:54:11 EDT
From: AGabinet@dechert.com
Subject: re: GSTwin Fairings - good or bad

Sorry -- I forgot to sign my posting about my fairing experience --

Ari Gabinet
'90 GS500E
- -------------
Original Text
From: suzuki-gs-twin(a)list.sirius.com, on 5/30/97 8:53 AM:
In response to mike's inquiry, Suzuki used to make a fairing upper and a 
lower cowling for the GS500.   After my recent low speed front ender on my 
'90 GS500, my fairing was trashed, and I was looking for a replacement.  
Midwest Action Cycle and Parts Depot both advised that Suzuki no longer 
makes the fairing, at least the upper (I never thought the lower cowling 
was worth much).  Anyway, my view is that the handlebar mounted fairing 
wasn't so great, because it tended to destabilize steering, and in the 
stock riding position it didn't offer much wind protection.  My soloution 
- -- I ordered a full frame mounted fairing from Spec II in California.  it 
hasn't arrived yet, so i don't know how hard it will be to mount, but when 
it arrives  I'll post the results!  I also ordered telefix clip ons (on the 
recommendation of a couple of people on this list -- Joyce, in particular); 
I may lower the forks and mount the bars above the triple clamp rather than 
below, but either way, I'm hopingthat the combination of lower riding 
position and frame mounted fairing will be smoother and more responsive 
than the stock bars with the bar mounted non-fairing.  
- -------------
Original Text
From: suzuki-gs-twin(a)list.sirius.com, on 5/29/97 8:21 PM:
Are there any good quality fairings that fit on a GS500E that don't
require much more work than just bolting it on?  I've seen pictures
of GS500's from Japan that have full body work.  Does Suzuki sell
fairings for the GS500?  Both uppers and lowers?  And are they
completely out of sight price-wise?  I've seen some after-market,
"this one fits MANY bikes" fairings, but the always seem to need
a lot of work to get them on the bike, and the results *I* would
produce would be less than great.

Anyone with suggestions, experience doing this?

Thanks,

Mike
'91 GS500E

s

------------------------------

End of GSTwin-digest V1 #27
***************************
GSTwin-digest           Sunday, June 1 1997           Volume 01 : Number 028




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 May 1997 10:15:48 -0700
From: hwoien@juno.com (Harvey M Woien)
Subject: Re: GSTwin-digest V1 #26

>Date: Thu, 29 May 1997 08:42:27 -0400 (EDT)
>From: Zaner30@aol.com
>Subject: Re: GSTwin-digest V1 #25
>
>I'm looking for a first bike and the GS500E is one of my top choices. 
>Mainly
>I will be using it to commute at college and for some day trips. Has 
>anyone
>taken this bike for a fairly long trip? If so how well did it go? 
>Also, what
>are some important things to know about the bike when I buy it?
>
>Thanks
>Zane

Assuming you are buying a new GS500E, be aware that (in the
Los Angeles area  anyway) there are new "non-current" models such
as 95's and 96's which differ only in color from the current 97's.
The prices are considerably less. I recently bought a new '95 because
I like the color and I am parsimonious about my bike purchases.  ;)

Harvey Woien

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 May 1997 10:23:30 -1000 (HST)
From: straubis@pixi.com (Straub Tech)
Subject: GSTwin GS500e manuals

I don't know if this question has been asked:

        What repair manual do you people use?
                The Suzuki Book?  Hayes?  Chilton??


Robert

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 May 1997 17:37:16 -0400 (EDT)
From: fshixon@muskie.lerc.nasa.gov (D Hixon)
Subject: Re:  GSTwin GS500e manuals

Hi folks,

The Suzuki manual is very good, in my opinion.  Actually, in general,
Suzuki manuals are pretty good.

Later,

Ray Hixon

- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
R Hixon                         |     phone: (216) 962-3146
ICOMP, Ohio Aerospace Institute |     NASB #623
22800 Cedar Point RD            |     1995 Triumph Speed Triple for sale...
Brook Park, Ohio  44142         |     email:  fshixon@muskie.lerc.nasa.gov 
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 May 1997 17:22:06 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: Re: GSTwin GS500e manuals

> I don't know if this question has been asked:
> 
>         What repair manual do you people use?
>                 The Suzuki Book?  Hayes?  Chilton??
> 

Hello Robert,

It is hard to beat the factory manual as they often have many more 
specifications for parts given in them than the aftermarket manual.  
Plus, the aftermarket manuals will occasionally deem something to 
complicated to cover, where this is usually not the case with the 
factory books.  Whenever they are available, I always pay the extra 
money for a factory book.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 May 1997 21:59:25 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: GSTwin Lots more pictures on the web site

The latest addition is an entire section devoted to some of the 2, 3
and 4 wheeled racing vehicles (and a 120 mph race-vehicle transporter)
constructed by former GP sidecar racer/constructor Rudi Kurth.

There are Kurth CAT sidecar outfits with BMW twin Rennsport four
stroke and Crescent and Yamaha 3 cylinder (yes, Yamaha) two stroke
engines.  The solos are Yamaha and Crescent triple powered
semi-kneelers, and the four wheelers include Alfa and Fiat racers, as
well as the CATVAN and several solar-powered racing vehicles.

I've also set up a separate page for the line of composite chassised
bicycles that Rudi makes.

Cool stuff - check it out.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 1 Jun 1997 10:40:07 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: GSTwin Determining rear damper length

I initially wrote this to send to Alec Millet in Australia, who is
trying to decide what dampers to buy for his Ducati 350 road racer.  I
thought that it might be of use to someone else.  This is a pretty
basic treatment, and if you are running a 100 bhp bike this procedure
may require a bit of modification on the final setup.
********************************************

Before buying your rear dampers do this:

Pull off the dampers and let the tire rest inside the rear fender.
Measure the center-center distance on the damper mounts, then add 1/2"
to that for fender clearance and record this dimension.  Be aware that
fender clearance can vary with chain adjuster position so to check
that out move the adjusters full forward and full aft to see if the
minimum clearance changes.  

Now put the bike back on the stand (still without dampers) and let the
rear wheel droop.  I don't know if you still have the passenger peg
mounts, as they are often used as an exhaust mount on the Ducati
singles, but let the wheel go down until you start to see the chain
interfering with the top of the swing arm pivot or other parts of the
bike.  Measure the damper mounts again.

Now align the c/s sprocket, swing arm pivot and rear axle on the
same line.  Measure the damper mounts again.  This should be the
tightest point on the chain, and the chain will loosen as the rear
axle moves up or down.  This is a good time to set your chain tension.
 When you get a final setting on the damper lengths you can measure
the chain slack at full extension of the rear suspension and record
that figure for later use.  This is much easier than pulling the
dampers off every time you want to adjust the chain!

You now know the potential maximum and minimum lengths of the
dampers. 

Try to get a 4" travel damper, as the Ducati dampers are not heavily
leveraged on the swing arm and 4-5" of travel is pretty nice to have
on a road racer, especially on a bumpy course.  I think that both my
Laverda and the Honda run close to 5" of travel in the rear
suspension.  The longer travel lets you run a little more sag,
allowing the rear wheel to move down into dips in the road instead of
leaving the ground when encountering the dip.  The longer travel will
also let you run a lighter spring.  Sometimes the dampers come with
shorter travel done by adding spacers on the shaft, and I've
successfully cut these off of Girlings/Hagons (the Hagons are plastic)
to increase travel. Don't confuse these spacers with the rubber bump
stop.  Always presume the bump stop will compress to zero when
figuring the actual shaft travel of the damper.

Consider making the travel symmetric about the "3 points in a line"
figure, as that will keep the chain tension most constant.  Record the
max/min damper lengths that this gives you, and compare with the
potential max/min lengths you measured earlier.

I'd recommend biasing the length a bit towards the long side, as that
will steepen the front end a bit and give some more ground clearance.
As long as you aren't having massive chain rub on the swing arm pivot
you probably don't need to worry much about excessive anti-squat in
the rear end (besides, it doesn't seem to make a great deal of
difference in our small displacement low-powered vintage bikes). 

You now have a good idea of what damper length you need for your bike,
which may well be different than the length of the OEM damper, or what
your local "never seen one of these bikes, mate" parts guy will
recommend for your bike.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

End of GSTwin-digest V1 #28
***************************
GSTwin-digest           Monday, June 2 1997           Volume 01 : Number 029




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 2 JUN 97 08:52:46 EDT
From: AGabinet@dechert.com
Subject: Re:  GSTwin GS500e manuals

I have the factory manual and the Clymer.  The Clymer goes into lots of 
detail on "how to do it" which is good for a novice mechanic like me.  that 
said, I tend to consult both when doing work.

Ari Gabinet
90 GS500E
- -------------
Original Text
From: suzuki-gs-twin(a)list.sirius.com, on 5/30/97 5:41 PM:
Hi folks,

The Suzuki manual is very good, in my opinion.  Actually, in general,
Suzuki manuals are pretty good.

Later,

Ray Hixon

- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
R Hixon                         |     phone: (216) 962-3146
ICOMP, Ohio Aerospace Institute |     NASB #623
22800 Cedar Point RD            |     1995 Triumph Speed Triple for sale...
Brook Park, Ohio  44142         |     email:  fshixon@muskie.lerc.nasa.gov 
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 2 Jun 1997 09:24:56 -0400 (EDT)
From: MJBoltuc@aol.com
Subject: GSTwin 4 valves/cylinder????

I was going to ask this question in the near future but some one called me
last night about racing one himself.
what is an 4 valve per cylinder GS450?
I 've been told that they were Canadian models.
when were they made?
do they make more power than a regular 2 valve?
can you swap heads from a 4 valve 450 to a GS500?

ken lehman
in search of  the most obnoxious GS on the track 

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 02 Jun 1997 10:18:14 -0400
From: nigh@intrepid.net
Subject: GSTwin Summit Point in the rain

I had an eventful weekend at Summit. I cornerworked Saturday, and got to see
some great racing. The weather was good all day. I crossed my fingers that
our luck would continue.

Sunday started cloudy but dry. I was in the first practice session, and it
turned out that it was to be the only dry track time for anyone that day. I
ran out of gas during the practice session because I was too DUMB to check
my gas that morning.

I had originally decided to wait out my first race (LW Superbike) if the
track was wet, but since it looked like it was going to rain all day, I went
out anyway. It wasn't raining, but the track was wet. It was a two wave
start, and I was gridded on the 19th row in the second wave. I got a good
start and passed a couple of people before turn 1. Then I found I was able
to pass people all over the place! I couldn't believe it! Everyone else had
slowed down so much for the wet track that I was competitive for a change!

After the third lap I figured that I might take third if I could hang on,
and it's hard to explain what a great feeling that was! But I used too much
brake going into 10 and lowsided. My husband said I was way ahead of the
rider behind me. I should have taken it a little easier.

My bike and I slid into the mud bog at the outside of 10. The ignition cover
on the right side had ground through. I was able to start the bike and ride
it over to be hosed off. When we got home and I removed the cover I saw how
much mud had been packed into the ignition csae. It's incredible that the
bike even ran with everything so full of mud. I have a lot of respect for
the Suzuki GS500 because it held up so well in the crash.

Now that I got a taste of being near the front I want to experience it
again. When I started racing last year I said that I didn't care if I never
placed highly. My husband said I'd change my mind. He was right!
Joyce Nigh
CCS Am#909 WERA Novice#909
Suzuki GS500
Prell Concentrate Shampoo
Polyester Socks
UNIX                         
ksh: signature too long

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 2 Jun 1997 08:06:45 -1000 (HST)
From: straubis@pixi.com (Straub Tech)
Subject: GSTwin real wheel swap

I've been asking these questions to ken lehman (the other guy who wants to
spend a lot of money on a gs), and I thought that I would ask the whole group.

According to the Euro-Spares web page, it says that the 4.5x17 rear rim off
of a GSXR750 (with the five spoke cush drive) is a plug-and-play installion
on the GS.

I've found that the 4.5 rear hub is about 1/2" wider than the GS rim so the
whole thing sits off center.

My questions are:
        Is there more than one type of 4.5x17 rear rim that will swap with
the GS cush drive?

        If the above is true, how can you tell them apart?

        If I do have to do a swing arm swap, what year do I need?


Robert

------------------------------

Date: 2 Jun 1997 11:14:43 -0700
From: "Jonathan Forman" 
Subject: Re: GSTwin real wheel swap

        Reply to:   RE>GSTwin real wheel swap

Robert,

Crago Racing (Burbank, CA 818-840-6908) set one up for a racer at Willow Springs.  They used the stock swingarm and I think they may have had to modify a spacer.  You might give Jeff Crago a call for specifics.

Jon Forman
AFM/WSMC #654

------------------------------

Date: 2 JUN 97 14:22:22 EDT
From: AGabinet@dechert.com
Subject: Re: GSTwin real wheel swap

My understanding on this subject was that you definitely have to modify the 
spacers to fit the GSXR hub.
Ari Gabinet
- -------------
Original Text
From: suzuki-gs-twin(a)list.sirius.com, on 6/2/97 2:21 PM:
        Reply to:   RE>GSTwin real wheel swap

Robert,

Crago Racing (Burbank, CA 818-840-6908) set one up for a racer at Willow 
Springs.  They used the stock swingarm and I think they may have had to 
modify a spacer.  You might give Jeff Crago a call for specifics.

Jon Forman
AFM/WSMC #654

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 2 Jun 1997 16:57:24 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: Re: GSTwin 4 valves/cylinder????

> I was going to ask this question in the near future but some one
> called me last night about racing one himself. what is an 4 valve
> per cylinder GS450? I 've been told that they were Canadian models.
> when were they made? do they make more power than a regular 2
> valve? can you swap heads from a 4 valve 450 to a GS500? 

>ken lehman  in search of  the most obnoxious GS on the track 

Hello Ken,

As far as I know the Canadian/rest of the world 8v head drops right
on a US 450, but never having had one to inspect I can't say for
sure.  You can get good maximum power from a 2v/cyl head - the
4v/cyl head will probably show some advantages with more power down
low.

If you find out more on this from somewhere else please share the 
info.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

End of GSTwin-digest V1 #29
***************************
GSTwin-digest          Tuesday, June 3 1997          Volume 01 : Number 030




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 2 Jun 1997 16:57:24 -0800
From: "Michael Moore" 
Subject: Re: GSTwin real wheel swap

> According to the Euro-Spares web page, it says that the 4.5x17 rear rim off
> of a GSXR750 (with the five spoke cush drive) is a plug-and-play installion
> on the GS.

Hello Robert,

John Sweeney wrote the article - so any things that don't match up to 
what appears to be real life are his fault (or at least the fault of 
the person who gave him the faulty info) not mine!!!!
 
> I've found that the 4.5 rear hub is about 1/2" wider than the GS rim so the
> whole thing sits off center.

Can you measure both of your wheels and determine the center line to 
sprocket dimension?  If the offset is all on the sprocket side you 
may be able to thin the sprocket carrier without a great deal of 
aggravation.  I've done this to some other Japanese wheels that 
seemed to have a lot of aluminum in the sprocket carrier.
 
Cheers,
Michael 
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: 3 JUN 97 08:18:21 EDT
From: AGabinet@dechert.com
Subject: GSTwin Fairings

Our host  Michael suggested that my message about my experience with a 
fairing from spec II may not have made it to the rest of the list.  I 
obtained a frame mounted fairing from spec II for my '90 GS500E.  It took 
me about four hours to install, largely thanks to very thin instructions.  
It requires removing your stock headlight and installing a new one on the 
steering stem, figuring out how to put the fairing bracket on, and then 
mounting the upper and lower.  The result is actually pretty cool looking. 
The fairing is $700 painted, $400 unpainted (I got mine unpainted, since 
the unpainted color is white, and so is my bike).  Notwithstanding 
Michael's admonitions about Spec II, they shipped on time and all the parts 
(plus extras) were there.
- -------------
Original Text
From: suzuki-gs-twin(a)list.sirius.com, on 6/2/97 8:02 PM:
> I was going to ask this question in the near future but some one
> called me last night about racing one himself. what is an 4 valve
> per cylinder GS450? I 've been told that they were Canadian models.
> when were they made? do they make more power than a regular 2
> valve? can you swap heads from a 4 valve 450 to a GS500? 

>ken lehman  in search of  the most obnoxious GS on the track 

Hello Ken,

As far as I know the Canadian/rest of the world 8v head drops right
on a US 450, but never having had one to inspect I can't say for
sure.  You can get good maximum power from a 2v/cyl head - the
4v/cyl head will probably show some advantages with more power down
low.

If you find out more on this from somewhere else please share the 
info.

Cheers,
Michael
Michael Moore
Euro Spares, SF CA
Distributor of Lucas RITA and Powerbase products
Sole North American source of "The Racing Motorcycle: a technical guide for 
constructors"
http://www.eurospares.com
AFM/AHRMA #364

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 4 Jun 1997 13:08:06 +1000
From: A.Horton@records.usyd.edu.au (andrew horton)
Subject: GSTwin New Guy

Hi Gang,.. I have had some chats with some of you already (Steve H in
particular) but I did'nt relise this list was here untill yesterday....
when I acquired my GS500e last year it was intended as a between bikes
bike, but the little jigger grew on me and now I plan to keep it 'cos its
so much FUN..  Its used as a road bike and on track days and I derive that
peculiar pleasure ( that some, if not all of you, are aware of) called
toasting the big bikes........ He he he.

Here is alist of the state of play with my GS.

Front end.

Progressive spring preloaded to give 35mm static sag
Race-tech Goldvalve emulators using standard compression damping spring set
to installed length of 26.5mm
20wt fork oil set to Progressive listed volume, not Suzukis.
forks raised 10mm through the triple clamps
110/80 tyre replacing the standard 110/70.

Comments;  The 110/80 tyre corrects the over reading speedo, has more
compliant sidewalls (tyres are suspension too) and have a slightly longer
contact patch (takes the bumpsteer twitch out). Sliding the forks up
compensates for the additional ride height of the 110/80 tyre. The Race
Tech Emulators are very effective and improve the forks out of sight ( a
"must do" mod). The Progressive springs are O.K. but a single rate spring
works much better than the progressive if you are using the Emulators. If
only I knew then what I know now, it would save me the cost of tossing the
Progressives and buying a set of Race Tech springs.

Rear;

Suzuki RGV250 shock with adjustable rebound and compression damping.  Shock
rebuilt to Production Race spec.
Modified linkage via changing the length of the Drag links, which look like
dog bones and join the swingarm to the rocker arm. Standard = 175mm centre
to centre, new (set #4..!) 183mm centre to centre.
140/70 rear tyre to replace standard 130/70.
Rear ride height raised 20mm from standard with 35mm static sag.

Comment;  I dont know if the RGV250 was sold in the States but another
option is to see what is on the market for the GSF400 Bandit. Its possible
that an aftermarket shock for the 600 katana may work with a softer spring.
Remember that as you alter the length of the "dog bones" you not only alter
the ride height but the leverage the swing arm has over the shock. The
longer the "dog bone" the more leverage the wheel has over the shock and
the softer the spring will feel. The GS500 is undertyred with the 130/70
(usually Jap bikes are overtyred for style).  The 140/70 cures that
unstable feel at full lean and improves tyre life and ride comfort at the
same time.  My favourite tyres are Bridgestone BT39s. Sticky and fun, they
last about 6000km.

Enjoy your GS guys, I enjoy mine...



andrew horton
systems management
university of sydney
ph(02) 9351 5065
e-mail A Horton@records.usyd.edu.au

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End of GSTwin-digest V1 #30
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